Hybrid Premium

If you want to go green, you'll need to drop some green. It's called the hybrid premium and everyone knows about it, but just how much it is – and how long it will take you to get that money back – may surprise you.

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It Costs Green to Go Green

If you’re considering a hybrid, you know it’s going to cost more. On average a hybrid will cost 10-20% more than its gas counterpart. Automakers say the price gap is because of the added complexities of a hybrid-drive systems. That may be the case, but hybrids also tend to come with upscale features. Some, like the Toyota Highlander, only come in premium packages.

The one exception to this rule is the Lincoln MKZ. According to Lincoln, they priced the MKZ hybrid the same as the V6 to deliver a message. And it appears to be working.

The Premium You’ll Pay for a 2016 Hybrid

Here’s a look at some on the premiums you can expect to pay for a 2016 hybrid. Note, we used baseline MSRPs as our price point.

Year Make Model Gas MSRP Hybrid MSRP Premium
2016 Chevrolet Malibu $21,625 $27,770 +$6,145 (22.13%)
2016 Ford Fusion $22,600 $25,675 +$3,076 (11.98%)
2016 Hyundai Sonata $21,750 $26,000 +$4,250 (16.35%)
2016 Lincoln MKZ $35,190 $35,190 Even
2016 Toyota Avalon $32,650 $36,650 +$4,000 (12.25%)
2016 Toyota Camry $23,070 $26,790 +$3,720 (13.89%)
2016 Subaru Crosstrek* $21,595 $26,395 +$4,800 (18.19%)

Is it Worth It?

Gas prices have been steadily plummeting in the United States, which means it’s going to take a lot more fill-ups before you start seeing any cost savings with a hybrid. This doesn’t take into account any tax rebate saving you may get.

Right now purchasing a hybrid might come down to how you feel about the earth, if you have any disposable cash, or if you think the cost of a barrel of oil will rebound in the coming years.